Monthly Archives: October 2016

What is meant when we talk about . . .

[W]hat is meant when we talk about action? You will recall that I always develop concepts from the standpoint of the observer who has to decide what distinction he wants to use to define action, if “action” is supposed to … Continue reading

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#477 with additional work — Jacob Russell’s Magic Names

21″ x 14″ Seated figure. Charcoal, acrylic, pastel View GALLERY HERE. via #477 with additional work — Jacob Russell’s Magic Names

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Crossing and Conditioning

In our sexist society, men are supposed to be assertive and women are supposed to be passive and agreeable. Active/passive is a two-sided form, and the boundary between active and passive must be crossable, allowing for oscillation. It must be possible … Continue reading

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Two-Sided Forms

Religion observes through the form of transcendence/immanence. The “ground of all being” is transcendent; this is what we do not see or experience in daily life, but, according to the religion system, we can get a glimpse through the curtain in … Continue reading

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Klaus P. Japp on new social protest movements

Klaus P. Japp has a very nice chapter in Problems of Form (1999 English translation. Dirk Baecker, editor. Stanford University Press). Below are my notes and comments. He begins by distinguishing between old social movements and new social movements. The … Continue reading

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The Subject

The subject has been understood, since the decline of the stratified society and the emergence of functional differentiation, as the observer, or an entity that looks out at the world and processes sensory impressions. Thus, we have the subject as … Continue reading

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Infinite Regress: It’s turtles all the way down

Probably at least since the 18th century, there has been a lot of talk about what science and religion have in common.  The commonplace argument is that science and religion are both seeking truth but in different ways. There is … Continue reading

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